• Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. to Arthur Goodwin with their bid for replacing lights, November 17, 1927

    Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. to Arthur Goodwin with their bid for replacing lights, November 17, 1927

    Carlson & Borrough, Inc.

    Letter from Carlson & Borrough, Inc. regarding the cost of installation for lights above farmers stalls in Pike Place Market.

    Identifier: spl_sh_00042

    Date: 1927-11-17

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, March 12, 1951

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, March 12, 1951

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch describing his trips to Alaska with the Harriman Expedition and on other occasions. He encourages Leitch to review the volumes on the Harriman Expedition at the Seattle Public Library and states "If I had time to spare, I could write a fat book on the story of the expedition."

    Identifier: spl_esc_024

    Date: 1951-03-12

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, January 27, 1951

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, January 27, 1951

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch describing the new photograph he plans to have made of himself on his 83rd birthday. He writes that he would like to see the new photographed published in the Seattle newspapers and is receiving many requests for autographed photos from organizations such as the University of Washington and the Seattle Historical Society.

    Identifier: spl_esc_021

    Date: 1951-01-27

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, May 8, 1951

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, May 8, 1951

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch describing a visit from Lillian Smart of the Seattle Historical Society to his home in Los Angeles. Curtis writes that Smart attempted to rush him out to a recording studio so he could make a recording of Pacific Coast history but he protested, saying he need more time to gather his thoughts. Curtis wonders if he offended Smart by refusing to do the initial recording. He states that he hasn't heard back from the Historical Society after letting them know he completed a script for the recording and was now ready to go to the studio.

    Identifier: spl_esc_026

    Date: 1951-05-08

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 4, 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, November 4, 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch describing his progress on "The Lure of Gold." He notes that publishing firm has expressed interest in publishing the work but he had to let them know it would be at least two years before he would be able to complete it. Curtis writes "For one of my age, that's looking far ahead."

    Identifier: spl_esc_014

    Date: 1949-11-04

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  • Richard Gilkey Interview, June 14, 1986

    Richard Gilkey Interview, June 14, 1986

    Richard Gilkey (1925-1997) was a painter and sculptor who was part of the Northwest School of Artists. Gilkey was born in Bellingham, Washington. His family moved to Seattle when he was 12 and he attended Ballard High School. During World War II, Gilkey served with the Marine Corps and was discharged because of injuries in August 1944. Following the war, he began to develop an interest in artwork and was particularly inspired by the work of fellow Pacific Northwest artists Mark Tobey and Guy Anderson. His work was featured in the 1948 Northwest Annual Exhibition and in 1958 Gilkey was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, allowing him to travel through Europe and further develop his skills. In 1975, he purchased a Skagit Valley home and developed an art studio where his work was increasingly inspired by the surrounding environment. His painting came to a sudden halt when he was in a car accident in 1984, which left him unable to paint for three years due to crushed vertebrae. He slowly made his way back into the art world and was awarded the Washington State Governor’s Art Award in 1990. The same year he was awarded the grand prize in the Osaka Triennale 1990 exhibit. Notice of the award came on the same day that a Skagit River levee broke and flooded his home and studio. Following a severe lung cancer diagnosis in 1997, Gilkey drove from Seattle to Jackson Hole, Wyoming with his revolver and committed suicide near Togwatee Pass. Gilkey’s works have been featured internationally and included in collections of institutions such as the Seattle Art Museum.

    Identifier: spl_ds_rgilkey_01

    Date: 1986-06-14

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, July 11, 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Letter from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch, apologizing for his slow response and explaining he is deep in his work on "The Lure of Gold." He writes that the size of the project is overwhelming and he is ""praying that I will live long enough to finish the job." Curtis discusses his climbs of Mount Rainier and his friendship with Ella McBride. He notes that she was one of the few women to summit the mountain unassisted and describes her as "my star helper" both in climbs of Mount Rainier and later, as an assistant in his photography studio. He writes that she lived with the Curtis family and was like a second mother to his daughters.

    Identifier: spl_esc_012

    Date: 1949-07-11

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  • Winter dance time

    Winter dance time

    Juvonen, Helmi, 1903-1985

    Helmi Juvonen was born in Butte, Montana on January 17, 1903. She worked in many media including printmaking, painting and paper-craft. She attended Cornish College of the Arts in Seattle where she met artist Mark Tobey with whom she was famously obsessed. Although she was diagnosed as a manic-depressive in 1930, she gained wide appreciation in the Northwest for her linocut prints depicting Northwest Indian people and tribal ceremonies. She worked with a number of artists on the Public Works of Art Project including Fay Chong and Morris Graves. Over the years, her mental health deteriorated and in 1960 she was declared a ward of the state and was committed to Oakhurst Convalescent Center. She was much beloved and had many friends and benefactors (including Wes Wehr) and was able to have exhibitions despite the confinement. She died in 1985.

    Identifier: spl_art_J989Wi

    Date: 1946

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  • Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, circa March 1949

    Letter from Edward S. Curtis to Harriet Leitch, circa March 1949

    Curtis, Edward S., 1868-1952

    Note from Edward Curtis to Harriet Leitch responding to her questions about how long he lived in Seattle and how he began taking pictures of Native Americans. In response to the question "How did you get the confidence of the Indians?" Curtis writes "I said we, not you. In other words, I worked with them not at them."

    Identifier: spl_esc_010

    Date: 1949-03

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  • Municipal News v. 55, no. 7, Apr. 12, 1965

    Municipal News v. 55, no. 7, Apr. 12, 1965

    Identifier: spl_mn_818362_55_07

    Date: 1965-04-12

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